kitparkerfilms

I’m researching the 1928 Weiss Brothers-Artclass Pictures serial, “The Mysterious Airman.” It’s the only silent Artclass serial that survives in its complete form – complete except for Chapter 9, Reel 1.

All I had on the missing reel are records from New York Motion Picture Commission (then part of the State of New York Education Dept.), which was little more than a censor board.

A number of states had movie censor boards. As late as 1970 I recall seeing “Airport” (1970) in Baltimore, complete with a spliced on 1950s-looking black and white (spread out to Cinemascope) censor seal.

Between 1921 and 1965, distributors were required to submit all feature films, serials (each chapter had to be applied for separately), shorts, cartoons and newsreels to the Commission for screening. Objectionable scenes had to be cut from the prints before a license to exhibit in New York would be granted.

As you’ll see, the censors demanded “views of a machine gun” cut before a license would be granted, Reason? “…they will tend to ‘incite crime!’”

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First Graphic Exchanges, Inc., a division of Rayart (later Monogram Pictures), Weiss-Artclass’ States Rights distributor for New York. Weiss-Artclass didn’t have enough output or funds to afford operating their own exchanges, so licensed them to independent distributors who sold film in various territories.

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We first met in 1979 at a private tour of the Hearst Castle, “Xanadu” of “Citizen Kane.”

 

The Kit Parker Films staff and their guests were invited to a special behind the scenes tour as a reward from the Hearst people for giving them some silent newsreels produced by their patriarch, newspaper baron, William Randolph Hearst.   The tour was remarkable. It also turned out to be life changing personally and professionally:

34 years ago today I married one of the KPF guests. Her name is Donna.

She’s not only my life partner, but Kit Parker Films’ greatest supporter, cheerleader, sounding board, and sometimes crying towel. Although not involved in the KPF daily activities, Donna’s behind the scenes input through the years has been invaluable.

When I met her she could only recall seeing three classics, “The Wizard of Oz,” “Gone With the Wind,” and “Psycho.” To this day Donna is not what you’d call a super movie buff, although she does enjoy good films of all eras. I doubt she’s seen a fourth of my library, in many cases for good reason.

Donna is a trouper, perfectly willing to listen to esoterica exchanged between film buffs. She’s been known to refer to some of the more extreme ones as “mushrooms” (live in the dark, have no social life, and reproduce asexually). She once told me, “When the conversation degrades to a dissertation on Cinecolor, I’m outta here.”

Kit Parker Films, and now The Sprocket Vault (she’s in charge of social media), would not be the same today had it not been for her. I know I wouldn’t.

 

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My father was an avid 8mm home movie maker. He also owned a collection of various Castle Films, and one from Hollywood Film Enterprises, “Buzz Saw Battle,” a 50’ excerpt from the Mickey Mouse cartoon, “The Dognapper” (Disney-UA/1934), which was a real let-down because it ended right in the middle of action.  [Above: Original pencil sketch from “The Dognapper,” which hangs on my office wall.]

 

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In response to my previous blog, “The Actress Is,” which featured a Louis Weiss Co. (successor to Weiss Brothers-Artclass Pictures) home movie catalog, collector Jeff Missinne was kind enough to forward a Hollywood Film Enterprises home movie catalog from around the early 1950s. It was photocopied years ago, so the quality isn’t great.

 

 

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Jeff Missinne also gave me the following information which he has allowed me to share with you.

Hollywood Film Enterprises had four Laurel and Hardy reels: Three 400′ sound editions and one 100′ silent (“Three’s a Crowd,” the phone booth scene with Jack Norton), all from “Our Relations.”  I own prints of the sound reels and, oddly, a 100-foot dialogue sequence of the two women ordering dinner in the restaurant is repeated in two of them (“Mistaken Identity” and “Sailor’s Downfall”) while the phone booth scene isn’t in any of the sound editions!

 

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I just acquired three of the Patsy Kelly shorts but haven’t screened them yet, they are spliced together and only the first one has a main title, so I have to figure out which ones the other two are.  (Six shorts from one feature; five sound and one 100′ silent, that has to be some kind of record!)  Don’t know how many “Grandpop Monkeys” were sold, but check out that bizarre list of sizes…100′ sound “headline” versions.

 

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I asked Jeff for an approximate year of the catalog and he responded further:

 

Afraid I can’t pin down an exact date, but would say it is somewhere in the early to mid- 1950’s.  By then they had gone through the phase when they merged with another company and were briefly known as Carmel-Hollywood Films; some of the Gene Autry reels came from that period; and this was before they began offering color Disney cartoons in 8mm.  (They were edited to 100 feet each, same as the AAP Warner cartoons.)

 

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I went thru my paper files and found my letters from Wally Shidler of HFE, but no further info on dates, etc. Shidler’s letter stated that HFE’s relationship with Walt Disney ended around 1960, but I have some reason to believe it may have lasted a little longer, as they were offering 8mm Eastmancolor prints of Disney cartoons and Disneyland travelogues, and I’m not sure if Eastmancolor was commonly used for 8mm printing until after 1960.  Most if not all earlier color prints I’ve seen were Kodachrome or Anscochrome.  It certainly ended though when Disney decided to open their own 8mm division in the mid-60s.  Wally stated that HFE was primarily a lab, and the home movies were just a way to keep the place busy between outside orders.   (I am fairly sure Eastmancolor was being used for 16mm printing by 1960, but maybe not 8mm yet.  (For example, when Castle started offering 8mm cartoons and travelogues in color in the late 50’s, they were Kodachrome; and I know a collector who at least claims to own some 8mm AAP cartoons on Anscochrome.)

 

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HFE existed before Castle Films.  They were making home movie subjects at least as early as 1930, maybe even before then; Eugene Castle didn’t enter the home movie field until 1937-38, though he was making 16mm and 35mm industrial films before then.  So apparently either HFE approached Disney or the other way, and they were releasing his cartoons as early as 1933.  Disney was apparently satisfied with the deal as it was renewed over and over for decades.

 

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At one time or another HFE also had Walter Lantz’s “Oswald” and “Meany, Miny & Moe” cartoons, though only in 50′ 8mm and 100′ 16mm silent toy projector lengths (I don’t know if their deal was with Lantz himself or Universal) and some of the Harman-Ising MGM cartoons in full length 16mm sound editions.  When Universal bought out Castle Films, HFE lost the Lantz rights, and Castle then offered the cartoons in a complete range of silent and sound versions.

 

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Jeff –  Thanks a million for providing the catalog, and especially your comments! — Kit

 

Footnotes:

[Jeff] —

“Grandpop Monkey” was based on cover illustrations by an artist named Lawson Wood that ran in Collier’s magazine.  The animated versions were made by Cartoon Films, Ltd. which had been the Ub Iwerks studio.  They were backed by British money and may have been made to run there first (not sure.)  Monogram Pictures (!) released them theatrically in the US.  The 3 titles HFE had were the only ones made, and were produced and released in Cinecolor in 1940.

One of the weirdest color films I have is an 8mm Ub Iwerks cartoon in original Cinecolor.  I like Cinecolor, especially for cartoons, where it gives a sort of “old Sunday funnies” effect.  Cinecolor’s color registration was very good in 35mm, not bad in 16mm, but by the time you get down to that tiny regular-8 frame it looks like a failed anaglyph 3-D image!

[Kit] –

Weiss licensed Hollywood Film Enterprises the rights to create home movie versions from some of its silent films. Weiss-Artclass Tarzan serial cut-downs were sold as “Tarzan of the Apes”; B-westerns in which Jean Arthur had a supporting role became “Jean Arthur Westerns,” and “Bible Stories,” were adapted from the 1920 Italian epic, “La Bibbia,” which Weiss-Artclass had released in truncated form in 1922 as “After Six Days.”

My family had some 8mm Ub Iwerks Cinecolor prints: “Sinbad the Sailor,” “Little Black Sambo,” and “Pin-Cushionman” (retitle of “Balloon Land”), all 1935. As with Jeff, I was enamored by the color.  The box art, “Fun Cartoons in Color,” was cool, too.

 

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Up until the mid-1930s, movie theatres used hand tinted glass slides for advertising – akin to today’s “pre-show entertainment.” I found these on eBay.

 

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Jean Arthur is the actress in these rare slides.

Jean Arthur was the female lead in over a dozen low-budget features produced between 1924-26 by Action Pictures productions, and released by Weiss Bros.-Artclass Pictures. The original negatives were destroyed in a fire. In 1979 I asked Ms. Arthur if she recalled appearing in them…she quickly changed the subject.

 

By the 1940s Louis Weiss had bought out his brothers and was operating his own company, Louis Weiss Co.  He became very successful selling low and ultra-low budget feature films to television when the studios were afraid to do it for fear of repercussions from exhibitors.  Weiss didn’t care because he ceased releasing feature films ten years before TV.

 

Louis also sold 8mm and 16mm movies for home use. “Jean Arthur and an All-Star Cast” one reel abridgements were offered by his company. [page two, top right]

 

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nobody's stooge

 

Bill Cassara’s previous profession, along with its “curse,” is a blessing for those who enjoy reading biographies that reveal heretofore unknown information.

Before retiring, Bill was an Internal Affairs Sargeant for the Monterey County (California) Sheriff’s Department.   He was, and is, a film buff. Laurel and Hardy were at the top of his list, and The Three Stooges weren’t far behind.   Bill is a naturally curious person, and wondered why nothing substantive had been written about two beloved character actors, Edgar Kennedy and Vernon Dent; and A-list entertainer, Ted Healy.

Professional investigator–movie buff–naturally curious person…a trifecta of attributes needed to pen three biographical gems: “Edgar Kennedy – Master of the Slow Burn” (2005) and “Vernon Dent – Stooge Heavy” (2010,) and now “Nobody’s Stooge – Ted Healey” (2014,) all published by BearManor Media.   I’ve read them all; he’s a good writer and knows how to hold a reader’s attention.

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Bill and I became friends many years ago through our mutual love and admiration for Laurel and Hardy. I first became aware of his attention to detail when I rode with him in his sheriff’s vehicle as he spent his day protecting and serving. At a stoplight, he “lit up” a driver and pulled him over for tossing a lit cigarette out the window. The offense had occurred so far back down the road that I still can’t figure out how he saw it. Subsequent ride-a-longs yielded similar surprises, while we discussed how he unraveled crimes starting from square one. It was no surprise to me when he became an Internal Affairs sergeant.

After Bill retired, he told me that a career in law enforcement can be a curse because it is a challenge to be out in public and not ignore people and events that don’t seem quite right. By the way, he only gave the butt-tosser a warning.

It disappointed me when several fellow Three Stooges fans gave his book, “Nobody’s Stooge – Ted Healy,” tepid reviews because it contradicted several long held “facts” about Healy being a bad guy. You know the saying, “If you tell a lie often enough it becomes the truth.” In this case, a legend.

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That being said, I thought Bill needed a platform to discuss his research methods that uncovered new truths about Healy.

The following is our interview of March 25, 2015…and be sure to check out http://www.billcassara.com.

Kit: Why did you get into the profession of law enforcement?

Bill: I wanted to make a difference; I was an idealist and put myself through college while working in jobs that dealt with the public.   I was a local history buff, so I had pride in where I lived. Another motivator; I was a victim of burglary; someone stole my coin collection that I cultivated over the years. I channeled my outrage into something constructive, a career peace officer. I consider myself a victim’s advocate.

Kit: Are there parallels between criminal investigation and conducting research for a book?

Bill: There are some, I suppose it depends on what kind of book. The three books I wrote all pertain to biographies of old film clowns: Edgar Kennedy, Vernon Dent, and Ted Healy. Projects like these demand that I research from scratch, remain objective, sift the facts from the legend and corroborate with existing evidence i.e. public records and reliable newspaper accounts of the day.

Kit: Do you consider yourself a “just the facts, ma’am” author?

Bill: Hollywood bios demand a writing style that is part historical, factual and engaging. Gone are the days when bios were written by glorified press agents. Today’s readers want a true picture. My career depended on my credibility as an investigator, writer of reports and expert witness testimony.

Now that I’m retired, I can write for fun. Imagine the joy I had in describing Edgar Kennedy’s “Slow-Burn” as a metaphor to a volcano eruption or relating the aroma of over-ripe fruits prominent in Vernon Dent’s time? I could convey that sense because I grew up in the same neighborhood Vernon did. The Healy book is more clinical and closer to how I used to write professionally.

Kit: How did you come to be a Three Stooges fan?

Bill: I think it was 1959 when all the Columbia Three Stooges films were released on television. They were a sensation and all the kids at school talked about them. Later that year, the Stooges made a promotional appearance at our local TV. affiliate and I fixated on Moe who did all the talking on the program. He communicated to the kids in a grandfatherly concerned way. The Stooges were accessible, unlike my other older film comedian heroes: Laurel & Hardy, Little Rascals, Abbott & Costello, and just about everyone in Robert Youngson’s film compilations.

Kit: Why did you select Ted Healy as the subject of a biography?

Bill: I wanted a challenge. As a historian I have always been interested in “what came first?” and “how did they get there?” I appreciate those who make me laugh; take the case of the Stooges’ success story.   In his autobiography: “Moe Howard and the Three Stooges,” he thankfully included details about the genesis of the act which started with vaudeville and Broadway star, Ted Healy. I was struck by the fact Healy died at age forty-one under mysterious circumstances with rumors that he was murdered. With my background as an Internal Investigations Sergeant, I thought I could clarify all the details. My secondary reason was Healy died four days after his only child was born, so Ted Healy Jr. grew up never knowing about his dad. When I found out that his son had recently died, I knew a book about Ted Healy would never happen unless I took on the responsibility. I dived into the murky depths of vaudeville. It was here, as documented by old newspapers and trade publications, that I compiled data and venues pertaining to Ted Healy’s slow rise to stardom.

Kit: Was Joan Howard Maurer receptive to your writing a book on Healy?

Bill: Moe Howard’s daughter was very supportive, she invited my wife and I over to her home to discuss it. She said it was interesting that a retired “detective” was researching Ted Healy.

Kit: What sorts of things did she share?

Bill: The thing that stood out most to me was her comment, “Ted Healy was very generous to our family.” For Joan to emphasize that point is revealing, it is the opposite of what most people think about the Healy/Howard association. Joan no doubt was repeating what her father told her. After all, it was Healy who     ”discovered” and mentored the Howard brothers and Larry Fine.

Joan had pulled a file labeled “Healy,” from her father’s personal archives. There were rare photos of Moe with Healy and many ads from their various engagements. I included several images for the book with Joan’s kind permission.

Kit: How did Healy come to be known as such a villain?

Bill: Healy died in 1937, almost eighty years ago and there is still quite a bit of emotion tied into it from “Stooge” fans. This was one of my interests in writing a book; why is Healy portrayed as a “Simon Legree” character in books published after Moe’s death?   Mel Gibson made a biopic about the lives of the Three Stooges and naturally included a Ted Healy character who was depicted viciously. The visuals made a permanent impression on the general television audience. Fans, authors and bloggers have been dog piling on him ever since.

Kit: What are your thoughts about Moe’s autobiography?

Bill: Moe’s book is considered the “bible” towards anything relating to Stooge history. Thank goodness his daughter took an active role in completing the project. Understandably, Moe cobbled together most of his recollections without aid of a diary or other documents.

Kit: What were the inconsistencies between Moe’s recollections and the facts?

Bill: When I first read Moe’s book, I was elated. Precious details were revealed for the first time in writing. It became the cornerstone for seemingly hundreds of books. Moe remembered first coming across Healy on July 4, 1909 while strumming his ukulele and singing with Ted, “Oh, You Beautiful Doll.”

It should be noted that Moe was first an entertainer and a beginning story for meeting Healy was essential for his book. One has to expect these kinds of things; many celebrities rely on great stories. Ted Healy sure did.

Most other writers simply repeated Moe’s tales, I started from scratch. It’s where any investigation should start. It may seem inconsequential to point out, but “ukes” were not known on the east coast until they were introduced by Hawaiians for the 1915 San Francisco Panama Exhibition. And the song Moe remembered wasn’t copyrighted until 1912 as a “Ragtime” piano piece.

There is a sequence in Moe’s book where he recounted when he and Ted joined with some local girls for a diving stage act in 1913. Since Healy was part of this act, it seemed important to retell the circumstances to the readers. The story goes that Moe and Ted began in show business as part of the “Annette Kellerman Diving Act” of 1913. History tells us that Kellerman was an international superstar by this time and had appeared in four movies with her aquatic acts. Her diving events were heavily documented by newspapers. Kellerman did not need 16 year-olds disguised as girls to help with her high diving act. Fortunately, Moe remembered an accident associated with his act that claimed the life of Gladys Kelly, there was a mishap on the diving board where she fell to her death. This accident was written up as a small article in the New York Times in an off-Broadway stage. This wasn’t the “Annette Kellerman Diving Act,” So the question remains, “Did Moe intend for the version of what was printed in his book?” I’m sure he meant the act was a “knock-off” of the more established star. Still, this raises a red flag for whom was doing the editing.

Another stumbling block was to corroborate Moe’s recollection detailing when he joined Healy’s act in “1922.” Moe said he answered an ad that Healy needed a replacement for an acrobatic act that walked out on him. It was written that Healy was playing at the Prospect Theatre in New York at the time. Later day researchers have never been able to find this “ad” in the trade papers. Furthermore, Healy did not play at the Prospect in 1922.

An existing program (May 27, 1923) shows Moe (As Moses Harry Horwitz) directing a play in his Brooklyn neighborhood. So Moe couldn’t have joined Healy until after this date. Moe described this act in his autobiography, “Ted was already in an act with his wife and dog by then.” This hit revue was called “Syncopated Toes,” and started on Sept. 3, 1923. Ted and Betty were the stars and producers.

Kit: What about Larry’s biography, written by his brother?

Bill: That book, “Larry-Stooge in the Middle” was allegedly written by Morris Feinberg in 1984. It was one of the first books about the Stooges by one who was close to the action…except he wasn’t. There are so many falsehoods in this book starting with the author; it was confirmed to me by Gary Lassin and Steven Cox (who were close to the project at the time), that Larry’s brother was in his eighties with a heart condition and had no access to research. This book was published by the appropriately named “Last Gasp” in San Francisco which is now defunct.

The ghostwriter apparently thought it needed “punching up” by making Healy a very imposing villain who was an archenemy with our favorite innocents. To make him more evil, the “author” described scenes in which Healy was so revengeful of the boys leaving his act that he would phone theatres where they were playing, introduced him-self and threatened to firebomb the place if their act went on. Think about this seriously; a threat like that would impact everyone in the theatre including the paying customers. The press would have written it up if such a stunt happened as described.

Perhaps even worse, the author had the audacity to print a date (September 30, 1930) in which Healy allegedly brought suit against “Howards & Fine” in Los Angeles, Ca. This was a calculated intent to invoke emotion into the prose for contrast.   Even more absurd; after his day in court the author claimed, “Healy lost the case.” Invented dialogue ensues with Shemp’s quote to Larry, “I don’t think we’ve heard the last from Ted Healy.” None of this ever happened.   I couldn’t find any mention in the Los Angeles papers of that time and they would have been all over that. I made it a point to search out the court files and there was nothing. Never mind that Moe, Larry and Shemp returned to Healy on August 7, 1932, the question is; why would they return if Healy was so dangerous? The truth is: Moe, Larry and Shemp, (later replaced by Curly) rode Healy’s coattails during this era. In 1933 it got them to Hollywood. This takes nothing away from the Stooges later success, but coming back to Healy was the break they needed professionally.

The damage has been done-for over thirty years people have been conditioned to believe Healy was a monster.

Kit: Did your research turn up any tidbits about the Stooges that you didn’t include because they had nothing to do with Healy?

Bill: There are other examples that Moe said that weren’t quite accurate; Moe said Shemp quit Healy’s act to join Vitaphone as “Knobby Walsh.” That role didn’t occur until years later. Moe described his brother Curly cutting it up as a member of Orville Knapp’s Band in 1929. Knapp didn’t have his own band until 1934 (Knapp was a musician for another band in 1929). I can pass all that off as entertainment.   My main concern in credibility was in one particular sequence in Moe’s book; it was after the filming of “Soup to Nuts” in 1930 when Moe, Larry and Shemp split from Healy after their contract expired.   According to Moe’s book, the reason for the separation was because he heard a third person rumor that Fox was going to offer Moe, Larry and Shemp a seven-year deal. The story goes that Healy squashed it by appealing to a company executive. This is curious because Fox wasn’t making short comedies at this time and they certainly wouldn’t have started up a whole new unit during this stage of the depression. I have a hard time grasping that Fox would offer the boys (sans big name Healy) a seven-year feature deal (even back-loaded) on the strength of their performance in “Soup to Nuts.” They weren’t even known as “Stooges” yet. Moe allegedly claimed Healy “begged us to come back to him,” and “I don’t have an act without you.” In truth, Ted Healy could throw his hat on the stage and be well received. He put together other comic foils and continued in big-time vaudeville. He really struck gold when he performed on Broadway with Fanny Brice and Phil Baker in “Crazy Quilt.” The act toured America’s biggest cities throughout 1931 based on advanced ticket sales.

This may be considered sacrilegious, but when Moe discussed the Healy era, were his writings embellished? Or did his publisher (like the Larry book), fill in details to make things more dramatic? It should be emphasized that Moe died before his book was published and tampering with the material could explain some of the inconsistencies and drama.

Kit: Any thoughts, even little ones, about writing another biography?

Bill: The reason I wrote books about Kennedy, Dent, and Healy is because I had so much interest in them from seeing their films. They deserved a study. I have many more favorites that I hope someday other authors pursue. I would love to read a book about: Leon Errol, Andy Clyde, Bud Jamison, Mae Busch, Lloyd Bacon, and even the tragic stories of F. Richard Jones and Clyde Bruckman…the list goes on. Is there a market there?

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 Bill Cassara about the time of the “butt-tossing” incident.

Retire?

No way…I’m still finding too many interesting movies to release on DVD/Blu-ray.

Hard to believe Kit Parker Films just celebrated its 45th year in the distribution of classic motion pictures! Back in 1971 the 16mm non-theatrical industry was thriving, but it was largely owned by corporations which were passionate about money, but dispassionate about films, and the quality of the film prints showed it. I saw a niche to be filled — renting out quality prints at affordable prices, and Kit Parker Films was born.

The 16mm library expanded throughout the years until home video made inroads into the industry — the quality of VHS was marginal at best, but the price was right. By the 90s I branched out into the 35mm theatrical arena, eventually becoming the go-to source for classics in the 35mm film format.

In the late 1990s I realized the days of projecting celluloid were going to be replaced by DVDs, so slowly phased out the “old” KPF, and in 2001 began purchasing the copyrights to vintage films. Over the next 15 years my collection grew to include hundreds of feature films, television programs, serials and shorts.   Many of my acquisitions required a great degree of patience and detective work to clear rights and locate suitable elements, but those efforts unearthed many films that had seen little or no exposure for decades.

Launching my library on DVD was a success, but like other producers, my profit was far too diluted by wholesalers, and their related “expenses” that I had to pay for, but that was the traditional method media (starting with books) made its way to stores and customers for over 100 years.

Amazon has been amazing for people like me who don’t like to go to stores. By 2015 they were by far the #1 seller for my DVDs.  Over time I noticed that some items I’d buy would say “Sold by ‘Acme Company’” and “Fulfilled By Amazon.” Amazon is making 90% of my DVD sales…I had a lightbulb moment! I can’t say why it took so long for me to figure out I could sell exclusively through Amazon, pay their fulfillment fee and continue to grow my business.

This means I can continue to augment my release schedule and continue to take a chance on projects that may not even recoup their costs. How many people are going to buy a silent serial, or an obscure cult film?  In this business you never know, but I’ve built my career on taking new risks.

So, I did it, and my new company, The Sprocket Vault, was born. Although TSV was created originally to sell my own DVD/Blu-rays, other producers have started approaching me to sell theirs…so my company is growing, and that means lots of new releases of interest for you.

 

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OK, finally got enough requests to convince VCI release these two on DVD!

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During the 1940’s – early 1950s before television killed “B” movies, army comedies, musicals (MGM or Monogram…didn’t matter,) themes about Tinsel town, and of course westerns, were guaranteed hits in small town and rural America.

 

Producer/distributor/exhibitor, Robert L. Lippert, decided to combine the genres for sure-fire hits.  He did, and they were.

 

“G.I. JANE”, is a musical-comedy taking place at an army camp starring Jean Porter (sorry, not Demi Moore,) Tom Neal (Hollywood’s real-life bad-boy), Iris Adrian, Jimmie Dodd (“Jimmie” from the “Mickey Mouse Club,) and Jeanne Mahoney, with direction by B-movie stalwart Reginald LeBorg.

 

At a remote Army training camp in the desert, our boys in uniform want to do more than wave at the WAC’s, and a new recruit bets them $500 he can make this happen. A stern female lieutenant makes things tough but eventually it’s Mission Accomplished, the barracks filled with beauties and ballads.

 

“I Love Girls,” “Line-up and Sign-up in the Army Corps,” and “Nervous in the Service,” are a sampling of the musical numbers.

 

“GRAND CANYON,” a comedy with two songs (“Love Time in Grand Canyon” and “Serenade to a Mule”!) about Hollywood producers filming a western, staring Richard Arlen, Mary Beth Hughes, Reed Hadley, James Millican, Olin Howlin, Grady Sutton, and Joyce Compton, with Paul Landres in the director’s seat.

 

There’s grand fun, grand feudin’ and grand fightin’ in this spoof on low-budget Hollywood moviemaking. Assigned by Robert L. Lippert (who appears as himself in a pre-title sequence) to make a Western on indoor sets, Reed Hadley farcically tries and fails, and finally convinces the front office to allow him to shoot on “location.”  Rural audiences howled when an Arizona cowboy showed them Hollywood types a thing or two about acting, and ends up with the starring role!

 

Here’s where the filmflimflam comes in:

 

The advertising claims the movie was filmed at the Grand Canyon, and a prologue to the movie even thanks the Department of the Interior for its cooperation.   Sure, the exteriors are, but the scenes with actors, most of the movie, are filmed on sets, against process shots, or in a familiar location spot near L.A.…but who’d go see a movie called “Bronson Canyon?”   There are a couple of scenes with “actors” filmed on location, but are in reality stand-ins, shot in such a way that the audience couldn’t tell.

 

The fight scene featured in “Mike’s” dream was taken from “The Return of Wildfire,” another Arlen/Lippert film. Arlen’s opponent in the fight is Reed Hadley, his “director” in “Grand Canyon.”*

 

Viewed today, these movies are fun to watch, but remember they were made for the Princess Theatre in Meredosia, Illinois, not the Radio City Music Hall.

 

*Thank you Bob Dickson for this tidbit.

 

Contact:  kit@kitparker.com

 

 

 

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